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Mexico Bribe Lawyer Handles International Bounty Actions Which Expose Illegal Bribery Schemes and Allow Whistleblowers To Anonyously Expose Corruption and Collect Large Financial Rewards by Mexico Bribe Lawyer and International Anti-Corruption Lawyer Jason Coomer

Multinational corporations that offer illegal bribes and kickbacks to obtain business and large international contracts are the target of whistleblower reward bounty actions. These bounty actions offer large financial rewards to professionals and other people with specialized knowledge of illegal bribes and kickbacks to foreign government officials. The information must be original information and not from a public source. The bribes also need to be from a corporation under the regulation of the SEC or CFTC. Bounty Actions work with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and prevent international corruption. The bounty actions offer large financial rewards and protection to international professionals who expose government corruption. To explore a potential anonymous and confidential bounty action regarding Mexican official illegal bribes, kickbacks, and/or other illegal acts, please feel free to contact Mexico Contract Bribe Lawyer, Mexican Government Official Bribe Lawyer, Mexico Illegal Kickback Lawyer, and Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Bounty Action Lawyer Jason Coomer via e-mail message or use our submission form.

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Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Prohibits Bribes of Government Officials and Bounty Actions Allow Whistleblowers to Confidentially Report Violations Through Bounty Action Lawyers and Potentially Claim Large Rewards

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) prohibits bribery of foreign officials by U.S. companies and foreign companies listed on the U.S. securities exchange. The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) also requires such companies to maintain accurate books and records. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Whistleblowers that properly report violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practice Act by a U.S. or foreign companies listed on the U.S. securities exchanges can recover a large reward for exposing Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) violations.

By combining the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act with the new SEC Whistleblower Incentive Program, whistleblowers with original and specialized knowledge and evidence of corporate bribery and illegal kickbacks are eligible to recover large economic awards. By gathering this evidence and going through a lawyer, these whistleblowers can protect their identity through the process and potentially collect large rewards of 10% to 30% of the monetary sanctions including disgorged funds.

Please keep in mind that the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Bounty Action Whistleblower may be entitled to not only the amount of the illegal bribe or kickback, but the benefit of the illegal bribe or kickback. As such, in cases where $50,000.00 bribe is made to obtain a $200 million building project such as a hospital or pipeline, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Bounty Action Whistleblower may be entitled to 10 to 30% of the $200,000,000.00 and the $50,000.00 translating into over a $20 million to $60 million award.

Mexican Free Trade Policies have Attracted Foreign Investment into Mexico and have Allowed the Mexican Government to Expand Domestic Industries

The Mexican government has used new free trade policies to improve and expand its economy. By developing international trade and encouraging foreign investment through policies such a free trade agreement, Mexico has create a large free trade zone with Latin American countries, European countries, Japan, Israel, Canada, and the United States. This free trade zone has made Mexico one of the most open countries in the world to trade. It has also allow Mexico to attractforeign direct investments, develop its domestic industries, expand its industrial infrastructure, and prosper from increased trade.

Bribes in the Mexican Automobile Manufacturing Industry Can Be The Basis for Bounty Actions

Mexico has several sources of foreign income including oil & gas, industrial exports, manufactured goods, electronics, heavy industry, automobiles, construction, food, banking & financial services, and tourism. Among the most important industrial manufacturers in Mexico is the automotive industry. The Mexican automobile industry has developed their automobile manufacturing technology through working with multinational automobile manufacturers for several decades. This advanced technology is internationally recognized and is one of the best in all of the Latin American countries and developing nations. The Mexican automobile industry is more than an automobile assembly manufacturer. The Mexican automobile industry develops advanced components and engages in advanced research activities. Many large foreign automobile manufacturers have large manufacturing plants in Mexico and have been operating in Mexico for decades. Though the automobile industry in Mexico is dominated by foreign corporations, the domestic automobile industry includes DINA Camiones S.A. de C.V. that manufactures trucks, buses, and military vehicles. Through its purchase of foreign bus manufacturers, DINA Camiones S.A. de C.V. has become the largest bus manufacturer in the world.

Bribes in Mexican Electronics Industry Can Be The Basis for Bounty Actions

Mexico has also a large electronics industry including large corporations that design and manufacture computers, solar power panels, electronic components, smartphones, appliances, computer components, and some robotics. Some of Mexico's major electronic manufacturers are Falco, Meebox, Texa, Lanix, Mabe and OEM. Most of Mexico's electronics industry is driven by foreign companies and/or is heavily involved in international production and trade. Some of Mexico's major electronics corporations have international production facilities in Mexico, India, China, Chile, and throughout South America.

Bribes in Construction, Alcohol, and Aerospace Industries Can Be The Basis for Bounty Actions

Other large industries in Mexico include construction, alcohol and beverage, and the aerospace industry. Cemex is the world's largest building materials supplier and third largest cement producer. The construction company is based in Monterrey, Mexico and has operations extending around the world, with production facilities in 50 countries in North America, the Caribbean, South America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Cemex has rapidly grown internationally since the early 1990s when it began acquiring cement companies and cement plants in Spain, Venezuela, Panama, Dominican Republic, Colombian, the Philippines, Indonesia, Egypt, Costa Rica, the United States, Puerto Rico, and Europe.

Mexico's alcohol beverage industry includes Grupo Modelo that exports beer to the United Kingdom, United States and Canada and Fomento Económico Mexicano, S.A.B. de C.V. (FEMSA) the largest beverage company in Mexico and in Latin America and the largest independent Coca-Cola bottler in the world.

Mexico is developing an aircraft aerospace industry including the assembly of helicopter and regional jet aircraft fuselages. Foreign Corporations including MD Helicopters, Bell, Cessna and Bombardier build helicopters and other aircraft in Mexico. Although the Mexican aircraft industry is mostly foreign, as is its automobile manufacturing industry, Mexican domestic companies including Aeromarmi and Hydra Technologies build light propeller airplanes and unmanned aerial vehicles.

The Mexico Oil Company PEMEX is Owned By The Government And Bribes to PEMEX Employees Can Be The Basis for Bounty Actions

Mineral resources including oil and gas are owned by the Mexican government by constitutional law. Because of the government ownership of mineral interests, the energy sector including oil production and gas production is administered by the government with varying degrees of private investment. Mexico is the seventh-largest oil producer in the world. PEMEX is the public energy company that is in charge of administering research, exploration and sales of oil. It is the largest company in Mexico, and the second largest company in Latin America after Brazil's Petrobras.

Because of the Mexican tax system, PEMEX has limited resources to find new sources of oil or upgrade infrastructure. It is estimated that the Mexican federal government takes over 90% of the national oil company PEMEX’s profits for the Mexican federal budget. For this reason PEMEX has been unable to maintain, upgrade, and/or expand its oil and gas production. This failure to maintain and upgrade its oil and gas infrastructure has created declining production causing Mexico to slip from the sixth to the seventh largest producer of oil and gas. It also has raised several environmental concerns with its onshore fields and pipelines as well as its plans to go into deep water drilling. Though PEMEX claims most of its onshore problems are a result of vandalism, failure to properly invest in the Mexican petrochemical infrastructure is causing several issues.

Bribes and Illegal Kickbacks for Deep Water Drilling Contracts Can Be The Basis for Bounty Actions

To stabilize production output, the Mexican government and PEMEX are planning to move into deep water drilling to stabilized output after sharp decreases in some of it largest onshore aging fields. It is estimated that there are about 30 billion barrels of oil beneath Mexico territorial Gulf waters, but the trick is to have sufficient investment capital to obtain deep water drilling technology. By adopting new technology and investing in deep water drilling technologies, PEMEX hopes to have some 50 deepwater oil wells operating by 2015 and hopes this will stabilize production for many years. It is yet to be see, what foreign investment will be needed to upgrade the PEMEX infrastructure to allow the necessary deep water production.

It should be interesting to see if PEMEX, like Brazil's Petrobras seeks foreign investment to obtain the capital needed to safely advance its plans for deep water offshore drilling. If so, the competition for these oil infrastructure contracts could be fierce and include bribes of PEMEX officials, bribes of Mexican government officials, and other corrupt practices. It should also be noted that the Mexican national oil company, PEMEX, has many of the same characteristics of the Mexican electric company CFE. CFE has been determined to be a foreign government instrumentality in the Lindsey Manufacturing case. This means that PEMEX can probably be considered to be a foreign government instrumentality and will be covered under the FCPA and will be subject to Bounty Actions. The characteristics of foreign government instrumentalities under the FCPA include whether the entity was created as a public entity; does its governing Board consist of high ranking government officials; does the entity describe itself as a government agency; does it perform a function that the Mexican government itself designates as a government function; and is the entity financed through governmental appropriations or through revenues obtained as a result of government-mandated taxes, licenses, fees or royalties.

Large Multinational Corporations Are Competing Through Illegal Acts to Capitalize on the Mexican Economy

With the attraction of foreign business has come competition between large foreign multinational corporations that are vying through legal and illegal acts to obtain large Mexican oil & gas contracts, Mexican industrial manufacturing contracts, Mexican manufacturing permits, Mexican heavy industry contracts, and Mexican construction contracts. This increased competition between large multinational businesses to invest in Mexico and reap financial rewards from Mexican industries has created an environment where Mexican government officials are becoming targets for illegal bribes, illegal kickbacks, fraud and other illegal practices.

When large foreign companies and/or Mexican companies violate international law at the expense of Mexican citizens and local citizens through bribes, illegal kickbacks, false accounting statements, tax fraud, and other illegal acts, new bounty actions and whistleblower reward laws may provide the opportunity for whistleblowers to expose illegal acts and to also claim large rewards for turning in corrupt government officials and corporations.


U.S. SECURITIES & EXCHANGE COMMISSION Litigation Release No. 21673 / September 29, 2010 Accounting and Auditing Enforcement Release No. 3191 / September 29, 2010 U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission v. ABB Ltd, Civil Action No. 1:10-CV-01648 (DDC) (PLF) SEC CHARGES ABB FOR BRIBERY SCHEMES IN MEXICO AND IRAQ - ABB TO PAY $39 MILLION IN DISGORGEMENT AND CIVIL PENALTIES

The Securities and Exchange Commission announced today that it filed a settled civil action against ABB Ltd ("ABB") in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, charging the company with violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. ABB is a Swiss corporation that provides power and automation products and services worldwide. The SEC alleges that ABB, through its subsidiaries, paid bribes to government officials in Mexico to obtain business with government owned power companies, and paid kickbacks to the former regime in Iraq to obtain contracts under the United Nations Oil for Food Program. As alleged in the complaint, ABB's subsidiaries made at least $2.7 million in illicit payments in these schemes to obtain contracts that generated more than $100 million in revenues for ABB.

In the Mexican bribery scheme, the SEC alleges that from 1999 through 2004, ABB Network Management ("ABB NM"), a business unit within ABB's U.S. subsidiary, ABB, Inc., bribed officials in Mexico to obtain and retain business with two government owned electric utilities, Comision Federal de Electricidad ("CFE") and Luz y Fuerza del Centro ("LyFZ"). According to the complaint, the bribes were funneled through ABB NM's agent and two other companies in Mexico. The complaint alleges that ABB failed to conduct due diligence on these payments and entities and improperly recorded the bribes on its books as payments for commissions and services on projects in Mexico. Examples of illicit payments in the complaint include checks and wire transfers to relatives of CFE officials, cash bribes to CFE officials, and payment of a Mediterranean cruise vacation for CFE officials and their wives. The SEC alleges that, as a result of this bribery scheme, ABB NM was awarded contracts with CFE and LyFZ that generated over $90 million in revenues, and $13 million in profits, for ABB.

Bribes inf The Mexican Banking System and Mexican Financial Services Industry Can Be The Basis of Bounty Actions

Mexican has a strong banking system that is dominated by foreign financial companies. Mexico has worked to liberalize its financial industry and has inserted the Mexican economy into world markets. Large acquisitions of Mexican banks by foreign institutions include acquisitions by US-based Citigroup, Spain’s BBVA and the UK’s HSBC. This globalization along with a better regulatory framework, has allowed Mexico’s banking system to recover from the 1994–95 peso devaluation. A wave of acquisitions has left Mexico’s financial sector in foreign hands. These foreign-run financial firms compete with independent financial firms operating as commercial banks, brokerage and securities houses, insurance companies, retirement-fund administrators, mutual funds, and leasing companies.

Multinational Corporations Throughout Latin America That Give Illegal Bribes to Public Officials Are The Target of Bounty Actions

Many large multinational corporations that do business in Mexico, Central America, South America, and Latin America are using illegal bribes and kickbacks to government officials to obtain large contracts in several business sectors. These corrupt multinational corporations use these illegal bribes and kickbacks to Mexican government officials to unfairly compete with other corporations to obtain large contracts in Mexico at increased costs, to avoid environmental concerns, to avoid safety issues, and to avoid safe building standards. In other words, by bribing high level Mexican political government officials and or low level Mexican government officials in key government offices, corrupt multinational corporations can provide low quality and often dangerous construction projects, oil & mining exploration, defective products, and inferior services for inflated costs. These corrupt business practices are most common in the following business sectors: public works contracts, construction contracts, oil & gas contracts, heavy manufacturing contracts, mining contracts, pharmaceutical contracts, and health care contracts.

SEC Charges Alcatel-Lucent With FCPA Violations: Company to Pay More Than $137 Million to Settle SEC and DOJ Charges

The Securities and Exchange Commission charged Paris-based telecommunications company Alcatel-Lucent, S.A. with violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) by paying bribes to foreign government officials to illicitly win business in Latin America and Asia.

Mexico Contract Bribe Bounty Action Lawyer Confidentially Reviews International Bounty Actions

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) prohibits bribery of foreign officials by U.S. companies and foreign companies listed on the U.S. securities exchange. The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) also requires such companies to maintain accurate books and records. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Whistleblowers that properly report violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practice Act by a U.S. company or foreign companies listed on the U.S. securities exchanges can recover a large reward for exposing Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) violations.

To explore a potential anonymous and confidential bounty action regarding illegal bribes, kickbacks, and/or other illegal acts, please feel free contact Mexico Contract Bribe Lawyer, Mexican Government Official Bribe Lawyer, Mexico Illegal Kickback Lawyer, and Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Bounty Action Lawyer Jason Coomer via e-mail message or use our submission form about a potential Mexico Contract Bribe Bounty Action, Mexican Official Bribe Whistleblower Lawsuit, Latin America SEC Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Whistleblower Bounty Action, Central America Corporate Fraud Whistleblower Reward Lawsuit, or Multinational Corporation Illegal Act Bounty Action.

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