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 Oil Company Accounting Fraud Can Be the Basis of SEC Violations, Federal False Claims Act Lawsuits, Class Actions, Shareholder Actions, and other Oil Company Production Fraud Lawsuits by Oil Company Accounting Fraud Lawyer, Petroleum Accountant Whistleblower Bounty Lawyer, and Oil Company Accounting Fraud Whistleblower Lawyer Jason S. Coomer

Oil Company Accounting Fraud Lawyer, Petroleum Accountant Fraud Whistleblower Lawyer, and Oil Company Accounting Fraud Whistleblower Lawyer Jason S. Coomer helps petroleum accountants, petroleum executives, and other petroleum professions blow the whistle on oil company accounting fraud, oil company royalty interest fraud, oil company working interest fraud, and other oil company fraud.  If you have evidence of oil company fraud, please feel free to contact Texas Oil Company Accounting Fraud Lawyer, Petroleum Accountant Fraud Whistleblower Lawyer, and Oil Company Accounting Fraud Whistleblower Lawyer, Jason S. Coomer or use our contact submission form.

Oil Company Accounting Fraud Lawyer, Oil Company Fraud Accountant Whistleblower Bounty Lawyer, Petroleum Accountant Fraud Whistleblower Bounty Lawyer, Texas Oil Company Production Fraud Lawyer, and Texas Operator Production Fraud Lawyer

Oil Company Fraud including Oil Company Accounting Fraud, Oil Company Royalty Fraud, Oil Company Tax Fraud, Oil Company Working Interest Fraud, and Oil Company Production Fraud are forms of corporate fraud that can result in qui tam lawsuits, shareholder lawsuits, bounty actions, class actions, and several other types of fraud litigation.  Petroleum professionals including petroleum accountants, petroleum executives, and other oil company employees with original information of significant oil company accounting fraud, oil company royalty fraud, oil company tax fraud, oil company working interest fraud, and/or oil company production fraud by a large oil company may be able to collect a large reward through several whistleblower laws.

The key to obtaining a large whistleblower award is to make sure that as the whistleblower you are the first to file with sufficient evidence of significant fraud.  

Oil Company Under Payment of Royalties False Claims Act Lawsuit, Oil Company Oil Royalty Accounting Fraud Whistleblower Lawsuit, Oil Company Fraud Accountant Whistleblower Qui Tam Lawsuit, Petroleum Accountant Fraud Whistleblower Lawsuit, Texas Oil Company Production Fraud Lawsuit, and Texas Operator Production Fraud Lawsuit Information by Oil Company Accounting Fraud Lawyer, Petroleum Accountant Whistleblower Lawyer, and Oil Company Accounting Fraud Qui Tam Lawyer Jason S. Coomer

One area of Oil Company Accounting Fraud Whistleblower cases are the Oil Company Fraud Qui Tam Lawsuits, Oil Company Federal False Claims Act Whistleblower Lawsuits, and Oil Company Fraud Lawsuits under State False Claims Act Statutes.  These traditional oil company accounting fraud whistleblower cases have been common over the last twenty years and unusually are based on the Oil Company underpaying royalties and/or violating federal statutes.  Below are some of these lawsuits where the United States Department of Justice has forced oil companies to pay hundreds of millions of dollars based on qui tam whistleblower lawsuits.


Department of Justice Office of Public Affairs FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE September 16, 2011 BP AMOCO TO PAY U.S. $20.5 MILLION TO RESOLVE ALLEGATIONS OF ROYALTY UNDERPAYMENTS FROM INDIAN AND FEDERAL LANDS

WASHINGTON – BP Amoco Corp. (formerly Amoco Corp.), Amoco Production Company, BP Exploration & Oil Inc., BP America Inc., Atlantic Richfield Company and Vastar (the BP defendants) have agreed to pay the United States $20.5 million to resolve claims that the companies violated the False Claims Act by knowingly underpaying royalties owed on natural gas produced from federal and Indian leases, the Justice Department announced today.

Congress has authorized federal and Indian lands to be leased for the production of natural gas in exchange for the payment of royalties on the value of the gas that is produced. Each month companies are required to report to the U.S. Department of the Interior the amount of royalty that is due. This settlement resolves claims that the BP defendants improperly deducted from the royalty values they reported the cost of boosting gas up to pipeline pressures improperly reported processed gas as unprocessed gas to reduce royalty payments on federal and Indian leases, and improperly failed to perform “dual accounting” on certain federal leases.

The settlement explicitly excludes, and does not resolve, any claims the United States or the BP defendants have related to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

“Natural gas royalties provide an important source of income for the United States, Native Americans, and various states, and help support critical programs from which we all benefit,” said Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice. “Through cases like this, we are keeping our commitment to protect public lands and to ensure that companies who take non-renewable resources from those lands pay their fair share of royalties.”

“We remain committed to ensuring that energy companies accurately report production and pay the required royalties,” said Rhea Suh, Department of the Interior Assistant Secretary for Policy, Management and Budget. “We will continue to pursue every dollar due to taxpayers and the Federal Government from energy production that occurs on Federal and American Indian lands.”

The settlement arises from a lawsuit filed by Harrold Wright under the False Claims Act. Under the qui tam, or whistleblower, provisions of the act, private citizens may file actions on behalf of the United States and share in any recovery. Because Mr. Wright is deceased, his heirs will receive $5.3 million. The United States initially declined to intervene against the BP defendants, but intervened for the purpose of completing this settlement. Settlements in the case to date total approximately $270 million.

The investigation and settlement of these matters was jointly handled by the Justice Department’s Civil Division and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Texas, with assistance from the Department of the Interior’s Office of Natural Resources Revenue Office of the Solicitor and Office of Inspector General.

The case is U.S. ex rel. Wright v. Chevron USA, Inc. et al., 5:03-CV-264 (E.D. Tex.).

The Justice Department’s total recoveries in False Claims Act cases since January 2009 are more than $7.5 billion.


Department of Justice Office of Public Affairs FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Tuesday, May 10, 2011 Shell Oil Companies to Pay $2.2 Million to Resolve Allegations of Royalty Underpayments from Federal Lands

WASHINGTON – Shell Oil Company and other Shell affiliates have agreed to pay the United States $2.2 million to resolve claims that the companies violated the False Claims Act by knowingly underpaying royalties owed on natural gas produced from federal leases, the Justice Department announced today. Shell Oil Company is the U.S.-based subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell, a multinational oil company, and is a leading producer of oil and natural gas.

Congress has authorized federal and Indian lands to be leased for the production of natural gas in exchange for the payment of royalties on the value of the gas that is produced. Each month companies are required to report to the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) the amount of royalty that is due. This settlement resolves claims by the United States that the Shell defendants improperly deducted from royalty values the cost of boosting gas up to pipeline pressures, and improperly reported processed gas as unprocessed gas to reduce royalty payments.

In June 2003, Shell paid $56 million to settle claims that it knowingly underpaid royalties related to natural gas and natural gas liquids produced from federal lands located in the Gulf of Mexico. Today’s settlement resolves claims related to Shell’s on-shore federal leases.

“Natural gas is a non-renewable resource. When the United States allows companies to remove gas from public lands that belong to all of us, we must require those companies to pay all of the royalties they owe, because those funds support important federal programs from which we all benefit,” said Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice. “Through cases like this, we are keeping our commitment to protect public lands and the valuable resources they contain."

“We are required to ensure that energy companies accurately report production and pay the required royalties,” said Chris Henderson, Acting Assistant Secretary for the DOI’s Office of Policy, Management and Budget. “We will continue to pursue any case where companies do not follow the rules.”

Today’s settlement arises from a lawsuit filed by Harrold Wright under the False Claims Act. Under the qui tam, or whistleblower, provisions of the act, private citizens may file actions on behalf of the United States and share in any recovery. Because Mr. Wright is deceased, his heirs will receive $572,000 as their share of the settlements. The United States intervened against Shell for the purpose of completing this settlement, and had previously intervened as to the claims settled in 2003, but had otherwise declined to intervene in the allegations against Shell. The Justice Department previously intervened against several other defendants in the Wright lawsuit. Total settlements in the case to date exceed $233 million.

The investigation and settlement of this matter was jointly handled by the Justice Department’s Civil Division and the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Texas, with assistance from the Department of the Interior’s Office of Natural Resources Revenue, Office of the Solicitor and Office of the Inspector General.

The case is U.S. ex rel. Wright v. Chevron USA, Inc. et al., 5:03-CV-264 (E.D. Tex.) .


$21.5 million from Union Oil Company of California (Unocal) for allegedly underpaying the Department of Interior royalties owed for oil extracted from federal lands. Unocal was the last of 16 major oil companies to settle claims in four related qui tam actions in which more than $430 million was recovered by the federal government, plus an additional $10 million on behalf of Native Americans for similar losses suffered on tribal lands.

Chevron Corporation agreed to pay the U.S. $86.2 million to resolve whistleblower claims under the False Claims Act that the corporation and affiliated companies underpaid royalties due for oil produced on federal and Indian leases since 1988.

 Mobil Oil Corporation agreed to pay the U.S. $45 million, and Oxy-USA, Inc. paid $7.3 million, to resolve similar claims of underpayment of royalties.

$49 million from Shell Oil Company to settle allegations that Shell improperly vented and flared gas from various offshore leases with the Interior Department. The suit also alleged that Shell underreported and underpaid royalties on the vented and flared gas. In 2000 and 2001, Shell paid the United States $56 million and $110 million to settle two earlier cases involving underpaid royalties owed the United States on natural gas and oil, respectively.


PHILLIPS PETROLEUM PAYS $8 MILLION TO RESOLVE OIL ROYALTY CLAIMS MORE THAN $415 MILLION PAID TO DATE BY 15 COMPANIES

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Phillips Petroleum Company has agreed to pay $8 million to resolve claims under the False Claims Act that the company underpaid royalties due for oil produced on federal and Indian leases from January 1, 1988 to December 31, 1998, the Justice Department announced today.

Federal leases are administered by the Minerals Management Service of the Department of the Interior. Each month, oil companies are required to report the amount of oil produced and the value of the oil produced on federal and Indian leases. The companies pay royalties based upon the value of the oil they report.

J. Benjamin Johnson, Jr., and John Martinek filed a complaint in the U.S. District Court in Lufkin, Texas against the Bartlesville, Oklahoma company on behalf of the United States under the qui tam or whistleblower provisions of the False Claims Act. The two will share in the proceeds of the settlement.

Prior to today's agreement with Phillips, the Justice Department had reached settlements of more than $409 million with14 other oil companies to resolve claims of underpayment of royalties. Previously, the Department had reached agreements with Mobil Oil, $45 million;

Oxy USA, Inc., $7.3 million; Chevron, $95 million; Conoco, $26 million; BP Amoco,

$32 million; Texaco, $43 million; Pennzoil, $11.9 million; UPRC, $2.7 million; Sun Oil Company, $200,000; Exxon Mobil for $7 million; Shell Oil, $110 million; Burlington Resources, $8.5 million; Marathon, $7.7 million and Kerr-McGee, $13 million.

The investigation and settlement of the False Claims Act proceedings were jointly handled by the Office of the United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Texas and the Civil Division of the Department of Justice, with the assistance of the Department of the Interior's Office of Inspector General and the Minerals Management Service.

The case is entitled US ex rel. Johnson v. Shell Oil Co., Civil No. 9:96CV66 (E.D. Texas).


Department of Justice Office of Public Affairs FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Tuesday, March 22, 2011 Occidental Oil Companies to Pay $2.05 Million to Resolve Allegations of Royalty Underpayments from Federal Land

WASHINGTON – Occidental Petroleum Corporation, Occidental Oil and Gas Corporation, and OXY USA Inc. have agreed to pay the United States $2.05 million plus interest to resolve claims that the companies violated the False Claims Act by knowingly underpaying royalties owed on natural gas produced from federal leases, the Department of Justice announced today. Occidental Petroleum Corporation is an international oil and gas exploration and production company headquartered in Los Angeles.

Congress has authorized federal land to be leased for the production of natural gas in exchange for the payment of royalties on the value of the gas that is produced. Each month, companies are required to report to the Department of the Interior the amount of royalty that is due. This settlement resolves claims that the Occidental oil companies improperly deducted from the royalty values they reported the cost of boosting gas up to pipeline pressures, and failed to properly report and pay royalties related to a natural gas keep-whole agreement, pool pricing for gas and gas re-sold to affiliates.

“Natural gas royalties provide an important source of federal and state income that is essential to support education, critical infrastructure improvements, and natural disaster protection, among other things,” said Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice. “The Justice Department will protect public lands to ensure that when companies are given the opportunity to extract non-renewable resources from those lands, they pay their fair share of royalties.”

“We remain committed to ensuring that energy companies accurately report production and pay the required royalties,” said Chris Henderson, Acting Assistant Secretary for the Department of the Interior’s Office of Policy, Management and Budget. “We will continue to pursue every dollar due to taxpayers and the federal government from energy production that occurs on federal and American Indian lands.”

The settlement arises from a lawsuit filed by Harrold Wright under the False Claims Act against the Occidental oil companies as well as a number of other companies. Under the qui tam, or whistleblower, provisions of the Act, private citizens may file actions on behalf of the United States and share in any recovery. Because Harrold Wright is deceased, his heirs will receive $91,000, plus interest, as his share of the settlement. The United States initially declined to participate in this case, but was actively involved in the discussions that led to this settlement. The current settlement brings the total recovery in the case to approximately $230 million.

The investigation and settlement of this matter were jointly handled by the Justice Department’s Civil Division and the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Texas, with assistance from the Department of the Interior’s Office of Natural Resources Revenue, Office of the Solicitor and Office of Inspector General.


MARATHON OIL TO PAY $7.7 MILLION TO RESOLVE CLAIMS OF UNDERPAYMENT OF OIL ROYALTIES

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Marathon Oil Company has agreed to pay the United States

$7.7 million to resolve claims under the False Claims Act and administrative claims that the Houston-based corporation underpaid royalties due for oil produced on federal and Indian leases between 1988 and 1998, the Justice Department announced today.

Federal leases are administered by the Minerals Management Service of the Department of the Interior. Each month, Marathon is required to report the amount and value of oil produced on federal leases. The oil company pays royalties based upon the value of the oil they report.

J. Benjamin Johnson, Jr., and John Martinek filed a complaint in U.S. District Court in Lufkin, Texas against Marathon on behalf of the United States under the qui tam or whistleblower provisions of the False Claims Act. They share in the proceeds of the settlement.

Including today's agreement with Marathon, the Justice Department has reached settlements of more than $400 million to resolve claims of underpayment of royalties with 13 other oil companies. Previously, the Department had reached agreements with Mobil Oil, $45 million; Oxy USA, Inc., $7.3 million; Chevron, $95 million; Conoco, $26 million; BP Amoco, $32 million; Texaco, $43 million; Pennzoil, $11.9 million; UPRC, $2.7 million; Sun Oil Company, $200,000; Exxon Mobil for $7 million; Shell Oil, $110 million; Kerr-McGee, $13 million; and Burlington, $8.5 million.

The investigation and settlement were jointly handled by the Office of the United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Texas and the Civil Division of the Department of Justice, with the assistance of the Department of the Interior's Office of Inspector General and the Minerals Management Service.

The case is entitled US ex rel. Johnson v. Shell Oil Co., Civil No. 9:96CV66 (E.D. Texas).


Department of Justice Office of Public Affairs FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE May 10, 2011 SHELL OIL COMPANIES TO PAY $2.2 MILLION TO RESOLVE ALLEGATIONS OF ROYALTY UNDERPAYMENTS FROM FEDERAL LANDS

WASHINGTON – Shell Oil Company and other Shell affiliates have agreed to pay the United States $2.2 million to resolve claims that the companies violated the False Claims Act by knowingly underpaying royalties owed on natural gas produced from federal leases, the Justice Department announced today. Shell Oil Company is the U.S.-based subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell, a multinational oil company, and is a leading producer of oil and natural gas.

Congress has authorized federal and Indian lands to be leased for the production of natural gas in exchange for the payment of royalties on the value of the gas that is produced. Each month companies are required to report to the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) the amount of royalty that is due. This settlement resolves claims by the United States that the Shell defendants improperly deducted from royalty values the cost of boosting gas up to pipeline pressures, and improperly reported processed gas as unprocessed gas to reduce royalty payments.

In June 2003, Shell paid $56 million to settle claims that it knowingly underpaid royalties related to natural gas and natural gas liquids produced from federal lands located in the Gulf of Mexico. Today’s settlement resolves claims related to Shell’s on-shore federal leases.

“Natural gas is a non-renewable resource. When the United States allows companies to remove gas from public lands that belong to all of us, we must require those companies to pay all of the royalties they owe, because those funds support important federal programs from which we all benefit,” said Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice. “Through cases like this, we are keeping our commitment to protect public lands and the valuable resources they contain."

“We are required to ensure that energy companies accurately report production and pay the required royalties,” said Chris Henderson, Acting Assistant Secretary for the DOI’s Office of Policy, Management and Budget. “We will continue to pursue any case where companies do not follow the rules.”

Today’s settlement arises from a lawsuit filed by Harrold Wright under the False Claims Act. Under the qui tam, or whistleblower, provisions of the act, private citizens may file actions on behalf of the United States and share in any recovery. Because Mr. Wright is deceased, his heirs will receive $572,000 as their share of the settlements. The United States intervened against Shell for the purpose of completing this settlement, and had previously intervened as to the claims settled in 2003, but had otherwise declined to intervene in the allegations against Shell. The Justice Department previously intervened against several other defendants in the Wright lawsuit. Total settlements in the case to date exceed $233 million.

The investigation and settlement of this matter was jointly handled by the Justice Department’s Civil Division and the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Texas, with assistance from the Department of the Interior’s Office of Natural Resources Revenue, Office of the Solicitor and Office of the Inspector General.

The case is U.S. ex rel. Wright v. Chevron USA, Inc. et al., 5:03-CV-264 (E.D. Tex.) .


Department of Justice Office of Public Affairs FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Friday, August 20, 2010 Dominion & Marathon Oil to Pay $6.9 Million to Resolve Allegations of Royalty Underpayments from American Indian and Federal Lands

WASHINGTON – Dominion Oklahoma Texas Exploration & Production Inc. and Marathon Oil Company have agreed to pay the United States $2,219,974.98 and $4,697,476.57, respectively, to resolve claims that the two companies separately violated the False Claims Act by knowingly underpaying royalties owed on natural gas produced from federal and Indian leases, the Justice Department announced today. Marathon is among the world’s leading integrated energy companies with operations around the globe, and Dominion is one of the nation’s largest producers and transporters of energy.

The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEM) (formerly known as the Minerals Management Service) of the U.S. Department of the Interior is responsible for collecting and disbursing royalties from energy production that occurs on federal and American Indian lands, both on shore and offshore. Each month, companies are required to report to BOEM the value of the natural gas produced from their federal and Indian leases and to pay a percentage of the reported value as royalties. These settlements resolve claims that Dominion and Marathon improperly deducted from royalty values the cost of boosting gas up to pipeline pressures, and that Dominion improperly reported processed gas as unprocessed gas to reduce royalty payments.

"Mineral royalties provide an important source of income for Native Americans, the United States and various states," said Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice. "We are committed to protecting public and Indian lands and to ensuring that companies with leases to take natural gas from those lands pay their fair share of royalties."

"The Department of Justice must remain vigilant in protecting both American and tribal financial interests from unscrupulous business practices," said John Bales, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Texas. "These latest two settlements underscore that commitment."

"We will aggressively pursue every dollar due to American citizens from energy production on federal and American Indian lands," said BOEM Director Michael R. Bromwich. "That means companies must accurately report and pay the proper royalties on a monthly basis, with no exceptions."

The settlements with Dominion and Marathon arise from a lawsuit filed by Harold Wright under the False Claims Act. Under the qui tam, or whistleblower, provisions of the act, private citizens may file actions on behalf of the United States and share in any recovery. Because Mr. Wright is deceased, his heirs will receive a $1.822 million share of the settlements. The Justice Department intervened against several defendants in the Wright lawsuit. Settlements in the case to date include agreements with Burlington Resources for $105.3 million, with Shell for $56 million, with Chevron, Texaco and Unocal for $45.5 million, and with Mobil for $32.2 million.

The investigation and settlement of these matters were jointly handled by the Justice Department’s Civil Division and the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Texas, with assistance from the Department of the Interior’s Office of Inspector General, BOEM and Office of the Solicitor.

The case is U.S. ex rel. Wright v. Chevron USA, Inc. et al., 5:03-CV-264 (E.D. Tex.)


Department of Justice Office of Public Affairs FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Monday, April 5, 2010 Mobil Oil Companies to Pay U.S. $32.2 Million to Resolve Allegations of Underpayment of Royalties from American Indian and Federal Lands

WASHINGTON – Mobil Natural Gas Inc., Mobil Exploration & Producing U.S. Inc. and their affiliates have agreed to pay the United States $32.2 million to resolve claims that they violated the False Claims Act by knowingly underpaying royalties owed on natural gas produced from federal and American Indian leases, the Justice Department announced today. The Mobil companies are alleged to have systematically under reported the value of natural gas taken from the leases from March 1, 1988, to Nov. 30, 1999, and, consequently, paid less royalties than owed to the United States and various American Indian tribes.

The settlement with the Mobil companies arises from a lawsuit filed by Harold Wright on behalf of the United States. The qui tam or whistleblower provisions of the False Claims Act allow private citizens to file actions on behalf of the United States and to share in any recovery. Because Mr. Wright is deceased, his heirs will receive a $975,000 share of the settlement.

The Justice Department partially intervened against the Mobil defendants in the Wright lawsuit, and previously settled with Burlington Resources Inc. for $105.3 million, Shell Oil Co. for $56 million, Chevron Corporation, Texaco and Unocal Incorporated for $45.5 million and Dominion Exploration and Production Co. for $2 million. The Mobil companies were merged into and became subsidiaries of ExxonMobil, the world’s largest publically traded international oil and gas company in November 1999.

"The message to those who seek to evade their mineral royalty obligations is this: We will aggressively pursue you," said Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice. "We at the Justice Department are committed to protecting the public trust by ensuring that those who remove valuable minerals, some of which are non-renewable, from American Indian or public lands pay their full, fair, negotiated share for those assets."

The Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior is responsible for overseeing the collection of royalties on federal and American Indian leases, as well as federal offshore lands on the Outer Continental Shelf. Each month, companies are required to report to MMS the value of the natural gas produced from their federal and American Indian leases and to pay a percentage of the reported value as royalties. The United States alleged that the Mobil companies used transactions with affiliated entities to falsely reduce the reported value of gas taken from federal and American Indian leases, to claim excessive deductions for the cost of transporting that gas, and to otherwise understate the value they reported each month for their natural gas production.

"This settlement closes another important portion of long-standing litigation that MMS participated in to ensure that taxpayers receive their fair share of royalty revenues from energy production that occurs on federal lands," said MMS Director Liz Birnbaum. "The revenues collected from the settlement will be disbursed to appropriate Federal, state and American Indian accounts that were affected by the underpayment of royalties."

The investigation of and settlement with the Mobil Defendants was jointly handled by the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Texas and the Civil Division of the Department of Justice, with the assistance of the Department of the Interior’s Office of Inspector General, Minerals Management Service, and Office of the Solicitor.

The case is U.S. ex rel. Wright v. Chevron USA, Inc. et al., 5:03-CV-264 (E.D. Tex.)

Oil Company Securities Fraud Whistleblower Lawsuit, Oil Company SEC Whistleblower Incentive Program Lawsuit, Oil Company Accounting Fraud Lawsuit, Petroleum Accountant Whistleblower Reward Lawsuit, & Petroleum Oil Future Fraud Bounty Lawsuit Information

Securities fraud, also known as stock fraud and investment fraud, is the unlawful practice of inducing investors to make investment decisions on the basis of false accounting information, frequently resulting in losses, in violation of the securities laws and commodity future market laws.  Oil company whistleblower, petroleum accountant whistleblower, and petroleum executive whistleblower bounty action lawsuits include deceptive practices in the stock and commodity markets, and occur when investors are enticed to part with their money based on fraudulent misrepresentations. 

Securities fraud whistleblower lawsuits include outright theft from investors, theft from working interest owners, illegal kickbacks, under reporting of royalties, and misstatements on a public company's financial reports as well as a wide range of other actions, including insider trading, front running and other illegal acts on the trading floor of a stock or commodity exchange.  Evidence for a securities fraud whistleblower lawsuit may include:

  1. False or misleading information on a company's financial statement;

  2. False or misleading information on Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filings;

  3. Lying to corporate auditors;

  4. Insider trading;

  5. Stock manipulation schemes;

  6. Embezzlement by stockbrokers;

  7. Manipulation of a security’s price or volume;

  8. Fraudulent or unregistered offer or sale of securities, including Ponzi schemes, high yield investment programs or other investment programs;

  9. Brokerage Account and Retirement Account Fraud;

  10. False or misleading statements about a company;

  11. Failure to file required reports with the SEC;

  12. Abusive naked short selling;

  13. Theft or misappropriation of funds or securities;

  14. Fraudulent conduct or other problems associated with municipal securities transactions or public pension plans; and

  15. Bribery of foreign officials

Through new legislation the federal government is offering financial incentives to oil company securities fraud whistleblowers, petroleum accountant whistleblowers, commodity fraud whistleblowers, and other petroleum financial fraud whistleblowers to step up and blow the whistle on financial fraud including the above listed forms of securities fraud that lead to CFTC violations, SEC violations, and fines.  These new whistleblower bounties can be collected by whistleblowers that properly report SEC violations, financial fraud, securities fraud, commodities fraud, and stimulus fraud.

Other forms of SEC Violations including reporting problems with a brokerage or advisory account; fraudulently preventing access to funds or securities; fraudulent order handling, trade execution, or confirmations; fraudulent fees, mark-ups or commissions; and inaccurate or misleading disclosures by financial professionals, may also lead to potential SEC bounties, if the fraudulent acts result in fines of over $1 million and are properly reported.

Oil Company Foreign Illegal Bribe Whistleblower Lawsuit, Oil Company Illegal Kickback Lawsuit, Oil Company Violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Whistleblower Lawsuit,  FCPA SEC Petroleum Accountant  Whistleblower Lawsuit, SEC Whistleblower Incentive Program Lawsuit, & Illegal Corporate Bribe Bounty Lawsuit Information

Oil Companies that pay illegal kickbacks and bribes to government officials and former government officials in exchange for drilling contracts, pipeline contracts, oil leases, offshore drilling, mining contracts, and other large building projects can be brought to justice and made to pay large penalties under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.  The whistleblowers that bring these corporations to justice may be able to collect large economic rewards under the  Securities Exchange Act (SEC Whistleblower Bounty Actions) and the Commodity Exchange Act (CFTC Whisteblower Bounty Actions).

The Oil Company Illegal Bribe Whistleblower or Petroleum Executive Illegal Kickback Whistleblower may be entitled to not only the amount of the illegal bribe or kickback, but the benefit of the illegal bribe or kickback.  In cases where $100,000.00 bribe is made to obtain a $100 million pipeline, the Petroleum Executive Illegal Bribe Whistleblower or Oil Company Illegal Kickback Whistleblower may be entitled to 10 to 30% of the $100,000,000.00 and the $100,000.00 translating into a $10 million to $30 million award.

Stock Manipulation Scheme Lawyer, Corporate Accounting Fraud Lawyer, Fraudulent Accounting Lawyer, False Accounting Statement Lawyer, SEC Whistleblower Incentive Program Lawyer, & SEC Bounty Action Lawyer

As a Stock Manipulation Scheme Whistleblower Lawyer and Oil Company Accounting Fraud Whistleblower Lawyer, Jason S. Coomer commonly works with other powerful financial fraud and securities fraud whistleblower lawyers to handle large Stock Manipulation Scheme Whistleblower Lawsuits, Oil Company Accounting Fraud Bounty Actions, Petroleum Company False Accounting Statement Bounty Claims, and other Oil Company Multinational Corporation Accounting Fraud Lawsuits.  He also works on Medicare Fraud Whistleblower Lawsuits, Defense Contractor Fraud Whistleblower Lawsuits, Stimulus Fraud Whistleblower Lawsuits, Government Contractor Fraud Whistleblower Lawsuits, Stock Manipulation Lawsuits, and other government fraud whistleblower lawsuits.

Oil Company Accounting Fraud Lawyers, Oil Company Fraud Accountant Whistleblower Bounty Lawyers, Petroleum Accountant Fraud Whistleblower Bounty Lawyers, Texas Oil Company Production Fraud Lawyers, and Texas Operator Production Fraud Lawyers

Oil Company Fraud including Oil Company Accounting Fraud, Oil Company Royalty Fraud, Oil Company Tax Fraud, Oil Company Working Interest Fraud, and Oil Company Production Fraud are forms of corporate fraud that can result in Qui Tam Whistleblower Lawsuits, SEC Whistleblower Bounty Actions, CFTC Whistleblower Bounty Actions, Delaware Corporation Qui Tam Lawsuits, IRS Whistleblower Tax Fraud Lawsuits, and other whistleblower reward laws.

As an Oil Company Accounting Fraud Lawyer, Petroleum Accountant Fraud Whistleblower Lawyer, and Oil Company Accounting Fraud Whistleblower Lawyer, Jason S. Coomer helps petroleum accountants, petroleum executives, and other petroleum professions blow the whistle on oil company accounting fraud, oil company royalty interest fraud, oil company working interest fraud, and other oil company fraud.  He also commonly works with other powerful Oil Company Accounting Fraud Lawyers, Petroleum Accountant Fraud Whistleblower Lawyers, Delaware Oil Company Lawyers, and Oil Company Accounting Fraud Whistleblower Lawyers to handle large Oil Company Illegal Kickback Whistleblower Lawsuits, Delaware Oil Company Underpayment of Royalties Lawsuits, Oil Company Accounting Fraud Bounty Actions, Petroleum Company False Accounting Statement Bounty Claims, and other Oil Company Multinational Corporation Accounting Fraud Lawsuits.

If you are the original source with special knowledge of fraud and are interested in learning more about a potential oil company whistleblower lawsuit, please feel free to contact Texas Oil Company Accounting Fraud Lawyer, Petroleum Accountant Fraud Whistleblower Lawyer, and Oil Company Accounting Fraud Whistleblower Lawyer, Jason S. Coomer.


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Law Offices of Jason S. Coomer, PLLC
406 Sterzing, Second Floor
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